Born in the Purple was a traditional phrase used to describe those born to royal, prominent or high ranking parents. Like Wayward Heir, the suiting label for a young, ambitious and savvy man from established New Zealand suiting company Rembrandt.

 

 

 

“Royalty has an irresistible allure for the style savvy; perhaps it’s the decadent, ornate, elegant and leisurely lives many of them were born into,” says designer Jaime Winks. “Not unlike Edward VI, the short-lived son of Henry the 8th and England’s first Protestant King, the Wayward Heir man sees no need to follow conventions and would prefer to create his own,” she says.

 

 

 

“To honor Edward VI and royal heirs of his ilk, purple features throughout the Winter 2011 range, as subtle stripes in suit cloths, bold patterns, imperial brocade linings, internal picstitching and as both silk and knit ties.”

 

 

 

For suits, double breasted is incorporated hugely, yet as always with Wayward Heir, is a slim, more fashionable version of the classic style. “For the past two seasons we have seen the double breasted style re-emerge on the European catwalks,” says Winks. “We have offered our take on this.”

 

 

 

Making a regular winter appearance in the range is a variety of checks, from outspoken large black and white to the small black and navy puppy tooth, the oversize but muted check of the duffel to the brightly hued ginghams in the shirt range. Such prints allow the Wayward Heir man to give a nod to societal convention while distinctly standing out from the crowd.

 

 

 

For Wayward Heir this means bold linings, opulent fabrics and splendid finishing, all sure to guarantee a second glance. “Wayward Heir is for the confident, self-aware and charismatic individual who knows who he is and wants the whole room to know it too,” she says.

 

 

“Such a position deserves the respect ordinarily bestowed on those that are Born in the Purple.”

 

 

 

Photos & text Copyright Wayward Heir.

 
 
 
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